Home > The Foundation > Reflections

Reflections

Holy Father’s Prayer of Intention: december

That people, who are involved in the service and transmission of faith, may find, in their
dialogue with culture, a language suited to the conditions of the present time.

prayerICON-subpage.png

The last instruction given at every Mass is a missioning to the people of God to “Go in peace glorifying the Lord by your life.” By prayerfully and actively participating in the Mass, we encounter the Lord through the Eucharist and, moreover, tradition tells us that we enter the one eternal heavenly liturgy with all the angels and saints in one chorus of exultant praise of God. Such a transformative experience gives rise to knowledge of God borne of religious love, a fundamental definition of the theological virtue of faith. Faith, however, isn’t knowledge to be mused about or held to for private use. Rather, faith is a virtue of mission. Faith takes flight and is vivified when shared, spread, given away. The Mass sends us out into the world to share the knowledge received in the presence of God. St. Peter, at the transfiguration, was corrected by Jesus in that he could not stay on top of that mountain with Jesus. Rather, they had to descend and carry out the mission of spreading the knowledge of God gained through the divine encounter. The same applies to us at the end of Mass.

This month, as we prepare for the coming of the Lord into our world, God the Father sends His Son out of love, a sharing of His very self with us; let us consider the ways in which the Christian mission is about imitating the love of the Father. If our faith is authentic and rooted in love, then we are to share this faith by glorifying the Lord through our lives, in our homes, communities, workplaces, with our culture, and throughout the world.

Source: Apostleship of Prayer

 

Holy Father’s Prayer of Intention: november

That the language of love and dialogue may always prevail over the language of conflict.

prayerICON-subpage.png

prayerICON-subpage.png

We live in a world of much violence—wars around the world, in our communities, and even in our homes. Seeing and experiencing this violence provokes fear and anger within us, often tempting us to respond with more violence. But this isn’t God’s answer to violence. We find God’s answer on the cross. Jesus didn’t allow Peter to defend him from an arrest by use of the sword. Nor did he call down legions of angels to save him from the Romans who tortured and executed him. Instead he submitted to death on the cross. In some mysterious way, the Father used the death and resurrection of his Son for far greater purposes than any of his followers could have imagined. As Pope Francis eloquently stated, “In the silence of the cross, the uproar of weapons ceases and the language of reconciliation, forgiveness, dialogue, and peace is spoken.”

The words we use matter, and can move us towards greater peace, or towards more conflict. Our words are an expression of who we are, just as Jesus Himself, the Word made flesh, is the incarnate expression of who the Father is. When our words are hostile and aim to put others down, we aren’t imitating Jesus, and reconciliation becomes impossible. When instead we use the language of love and peace, this enables us to enter into dialogue with others, even with those who are very different from us. Through that dialogue we begin to better understand one another, enabling us to follow Jesus in building a more peaceful world.

Source: Apostleship of Prayer

 

This website uses cookies to help ensure the best experience for our site visitors.